A detailed look at Tadej Pogacar’s 2023 race bike, the brand new Colnago V4Rs

this week, cycling news‘ tech correspondent, Will Jones, is sunbathing working hard in the Spanish sunshine of Alicante, the current temporary home to the majority of the world’s professional cycling teams. Each December, more and more teams and riders migrate to the idyllic scenery of the Spanish east coast where smooth roads, warm weather and mountainous climbs combine to create the perfect base for a winter training camp.

One such team is UAE Team Emirates, led by their two-time Tour de France winner, Tadej Pogačar. Following a day of testing Pogačar’s new bike – the brand new Colnago V4Rs – on the local roads including the Col des Rats, Will talked his way into the team’s underground car parking makeshift service course. There, he was given permission to photograph the very bike – or at least one of them – that the Slovenian will use for his tilt at regaining his yellow jersey in 2023.

Scroll on for details on Pogačar’s bike, including his gearing and tire choice.

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

The makeshift service course was a hive of activity as Pogačar’s bike was balanced against a pedal stand for our photographs (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

We weren’t allowed to weigh it, but Colnago says the bike, in a similar spec, will hit the legal minimum of 6.8kg. This is in line with the usual weight of a Tour de France bike. (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

The model name, following in sequence from the V3Rs, is V4Rs. If you’re wondering how much a Tour de France bike costs, we have a full feature covering various examples. A Team Edition of this bike is available at the cost of EUR 15,260. (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

This could be the very bike Pogačar rides to Tour de France success in 2023. A lot of training effort, and a bit of luck stands between now and that happening, though. (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

One of the biggest changes for 2023 is the team’s switch from Campagnolo to Shimano. (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

This sees a swap from Campagnolo’s Super Record EPS 12 groupset – seen here on Pogačar’s 2022 Tour de France bike – to Shimano’s Dura-Ace Di2 12 (the 12 denoting the number of gears on the cassette) (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

The 54-40 denotes the number of teeth on the two chainrings. It is possible to swap the inner chainring to something different, so it’s not a guarantee that he’s running a 40T here. A smaller chainring would be easier to turn, and with mountains nearby in Alicante, there’s a chance he’s gone smaller. (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

At the back, the 12-speed Shimano Dura-Ace cassette looks to be an 11-30T, with a Dura-Ace chain too (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

Another huge change for 2023 is the swap away from Campagnolo’s wheels in favor of American brand Enve (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

Fitted here at the training camp are Enve 45 wheels, formerly known as Foundation 45. However, when racing commences, he’ll almost certainly switch to the lighter, more aerodynamic – and more expensive – Enve SES 4.5 wheels. (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

Here’s a wider look at those wheels (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

There’s also a swap from Pirelli tires to Continental (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

Continental’s best road bike tire at the moment is the GP5000 S TR, and it looks as though Pogačar is currently using inner tubes instead of tubeless. In doing this, mechanics have fitted tape around the valve to stop it rattling (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

Up front, the cockpit is made by Colnago, not Deda like the last bike (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

Richard Mille isn’t a bike manufacturer, nor a cockpit manufacturer, but a team sponsor whose expertise lies in designer watches. Keep an eye out on Pogačar’s wrist and you might spot him sporting one during occasional races. Julian Alaphilippe wears them too, on occasion. (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

At the front of the cockpit lies an out-front mount with an adapter for a Wahoo computer; a change from the SRM computers the team have used in recent years. This is different to the integrated aero mount that can be bought for the new Colnago, so perhaps that’s too heavy for Pogačar, or perhaps it’s unavailable right now. (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

His crank length is 172.5mm, which is quite standard for his height, though some riders choose to go shorter for comfort reasons (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

The Elite Custom Race Plus are a favorite among pro teams. They are carbon fibre, and weigh around 40g each (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

A threaded bottom bracket is typically easier to maintain than pressfit. It’s also less likely to go out of alignment and cause creaking (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

Each team has the rider’s name – usually accompanied by their national flag – printed onto every bike. This is to help mechanics and riders find the correct bike among a sea of ​​usually-identical bikes that only differ by size and fit. (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

Despite the availability of narrower handlebars, Pogačar has turned his shifter hoods inward to make them slightly closer together. This is said to put the rider in a narrower more aerodynamic position, but it can also help with comfort. (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

The top of the bars are a flat, aerodynamic shape, with a rounded leading edge and a squared-off rear face. This will have been tested extensively in the wind tunnel and optimized for aerodynamics (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

The Colnago seatpost features a small indentation. This could help the post flex under the rider’s weight, but Colnago doesn’t say. If nothing else, it provides a neat placement for the gold Colnago logo. (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

The ‘Club’ logo has been seen on Colnago bikes for decades. (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

Pogačar has switched saddles for 2023. He previously used the Prologo M5 Scratch, but now he’s using a Prologo Dimension with the ‘PAS’ cutout down the centre (Image credit: Will Jones)

Tadej Pogacar's Colnago V4Rs stands in an underground car park

Colnago doesn’t make a seatpost with 0mm offset, so Pogačar has instead had his saddle slammed as far forward on the rails as possible, past the recommended limit of the rails. (Image credit: Will Jones)

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